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>> down through history, all people have struggled for land. in israel, however, the struggle takes on yet another dimension. somehow, the land is infused with the holy, and the quest for sovereignty, for political peace, is wrapped up in identity and relationship. in fact, as we talk to religious leaders, political leaders, and the average person on the street, we'll find out that sorting out this difficult and tangled issue over land is really the key to pce in israel in the future. in order to get a better understanding of land issues in israel, we were very fortunate to speak with dr. menachem lorberbaum at the hartman institute, where he's director of the center for jewish political thought. this center provides a voice of reason and passionate understanding in a society that is increasingly polarized by issues over land, religion, the ethical dimension, and its impact on society. >> well, the issue of land has been an issue for a century also in the zionist movement. first of all, sovereignty needs territory. sovereignty presumes territory. and therefore, the question of terri
-in footages that we had over in israel here- i want to bring those in- let me move first to our first roll-in and look at islam in israel. you know, you would imagine there'd be some tension there, but there's a very vital and viable community there. we had an opportunity to go to the dome of the rock, and the al- aqsa mosque, and this is just a very short piece because it took forever to try to get in there with the cameras- they were not going to let us in. and to add to the tension, as we were trying to get in through the doorway to get into the arab or the muslim area, i should say, they hauled out a young jewish fellow who had tried to pray there. i think he was praying that somehow the temple would fall and so that the jewish temple could be rebuilt. i'm not really sure, but he'd obviously been beaten, and so, you know- machine guns, the whole thing; nobody firing them, but the tension is palpable over there. nevertheless, after- thanks to our good arab guide, we were able to get in. we couldn't do any video taping in terms of interviews, but we were able to get just a vision of the
much of the conflict is territorial. in israel, they want the land they feel god has given them, and then pakistanis want certain land, and yugoslavia, they want the land they had before world war ii. so a lot of it is territorial, and religion is shoved aside. >> you know, the nationalism- you know, you want to talk about "isms," but the rise of nationalism in our human cultural experience has been, you know, a two-edged sword, to say the least. and that brings up- it's a wonderful segue into our next class because we have a whole rather lengthy segment on how land in israel- sovereignty, identity, relationship- is linked to land. and for those of us who have grown up in the united states, this is very hard for us to realize- it's not something that's necessarily been challenged- but there, it's such a link. and we see people, you know, that form an identity around nationalism. now you see, maybe that's a very powerful way that people create identity and relationship. you see what's going on in the united states in the militia movement that we talked about and some of these pat
city of acre in palestine, which is now the city of acre in israel. after many years in prison he was allowed to live in various houses outside the prison walls but always confined to that area. the bahai world center is now located across the bay in haifa, israel. and the resting place of bahÁ'u'llah outside of the city of acre in an area called bahji is where the shrine of bahÁ'u'llah is located. so both the cities of acre and haifa are sacred ground to the bahais. there are many misconceptions about the bahai faith; one of them is that the bahai faith is a syncretism or a mishmash of previous religions. or merely a conglomeration of 20th century and late 19th century ideas and philosophies attached to religion. this is far from the case. the bahai faith has it's own independent prophet, it's own independent scripture so it is quite obviously an independent religion. and it was deemed as such by a muslim court in the 1940s as not a sect or an offshoot of islam but as an independent religion. the other misconceptions about the bahai faith vary from place to place throughout the
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4